Almost every black woman I know has a color story.
Good, bad, or indifferent — skin tone (in conjunction, of course, with our race, class, and gender) shapes our attitudes, beliefs, experiences and, at times, choices.
— Color Stories: Black Women and Colorism in the 21st Century

JeffriAnne is a sociologist whose expertise lies in race relations and gender, specifically issues within the black American community.  As a race scholar specializing in issues of cultural diversity, JeffriAnne’s primary areas of research include:  race and ethnic relations; the intersections of race, class, and gender; and minority experiences in higher education.

JeffriAnne is also a distinguished expert on colorism in the black American community.

Her book on this issue, Color Stories: Black Women and Colorism in the 21st Century, was published in October 2015.  In her book, she argues that matters of skin tone are central to the broader discussion of race matters in the 21st century, particularly in the lives of the millennial generation. 

While there has been much debate and discussion on the continuing significance of race in our society, there has been less attention paid to colorism, an equally damaging and insidious social problem.

 
 

JeffriAnne discusses the Color Stories: Black Women and Colorism in the 21st Century on NPR member radio station, WJCT-FM, First Coast Connect.